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Bun feet



I needed to turn 8 bun feet for the two military cabinets. Inspiration came from a chest of Ellis’ at Wood Central. Simple, elegant …




I struggled to find stock large enough and resisted gluing up pieces. I have glued up Jarrah in the past. It was a pain to turn - the end grain is so hard, and to be honest, the thought of this was off-putting. My little Jet mini lathe with its 1/2 hp motor is OK for spindle work but struggles with wide hardwood (not enough torque and too fast).

So in the end I decided to turn the main section of the bun from Radiata Pine, stain it, and add a Jarrah transition to get the height I needed. These buns are 3 1/2" wide and 2" high. With the transition added the total height is 2 1/2".



The buns were fitted with bolts into threaded inserts …



I used a brace to drill the holes as the slow speed allowed for the control to avoid going through the ¾” carcass.



Here is the fit ...



More in a moment. What I want to show you is one of the great pleasures of working with Jarrah.

Jarrah is hard. It is heavy. It is a pain to chisel and a pain to handplane. It is impossible to choose boards based on grain and figure. It is just so variable. Colour and figure vary so widely, even in the same board. Wiping each board with alcohol to get an idea of what it may look like at the end is nothing more than a rough approximation. You will still be surprised. It is this surprise when you add the finish that can make your day.

I had scraped and planed, and scraped some more. Finally I decided that it was time to start the finish (interesting phrase ..). I am using a new-to-me-highly-recommended (local) Danish Oil. Why Danish Oil? The finish needs to be durable and, especially, waterproof since no doubt someone will place a wet glass on top of a cabinet.

So a couple of coats and this emerges ...

Below (on the right side) is an example of choosing a board that looked the same but turned out a little differently than planned ...



And a final picture, now with the attached buns...

Next, the drawers.

Regards from Perth

Derek

August 2011